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Old 06-28-2010, 05:32 PM   #1
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How much tire fluid

I getting new turf tire this friday, I'm sure they have sodium in them now (orignal tires) and they are filled to 90%. I use the 51 8N for finish mowing, cultivating small garden, brush hoging, light blade work (snow and gravel) and light disking. I don't know how much fluid I need to fill them with. I don't want to buy anymore antifreeze than I have to. Can anyone give me some sugestions, I don't think I need as much as they have in them now. Thanks Rick



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Old 06-28-2010, 05:56 PM   #2
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As I understand it, you want to come just above the rims for preventing corrosion to the rims themselves. If you present the tire size, they should be able to give you a rough idea.



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Old 06-28-2010, 06:19 PM   #3
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The tires have tubes in them and no fluid comes in contact with the rims unless you have a leak. The way I understand it the more fluid (weight) the more traction you have and I don't know how much weight I need for the applications I use the tractor for. Thanks Rick

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Old 06-28-2010, 06:27 PM   #4
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Do you have a loader on it? What exactly are you going to be using the tractor for? I think that they can't get any more juice in the tire / tube than above the valve stem in the up position. I believe you have to be able to get some air in the tire for inflating it. I have no tubes in my rear wheels and the level is just above the rim to the valve stem.

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Old 06-28-2010, 06:27 PM   #5
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You might also consider wheel weights too in addition to the ballast juice.

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Old 06-28-2010, 09:50 PM   #6
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I thought about wheel weights, I use the tractor for light duty stuff mostly ( finish mowing ) and the less weight would probally be easier on the turf. Thats why I buying new turf tires. I don't have a front end loader, I have a very cherry 51 8N w/ 1500 hours on it, all orignal, all it needs is new paint and tires to be restored. Thanks for the input. Rick

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Old 06-28-2010, 11:27 PM   #7
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Unless your using a loader or a box scraper or the like, I would just ballast the tires. It doesn't sound like you need wheel weights, but that's just me.

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Old 07-12-2010, 08:36 PM   #8
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tire ballast

I would make a suggestion that instead of using Calcium Chloride which if you have a leak will corrode the rims, a lot of guys I have talked to use windshield washer fluid, it does not corrode and has a low freeze point (if your in a cold climate). There is also a product called rimguard that is supposed to be pretty good. I have a chart in my Oliver 77 manual that gives the weight and how many gallons a tire hold by tire size, it may be the 1850 manual. Either way send me a message with the tire size and I will look it up when I get back from this trip on Wednesday. My thought as to how much to add would be a little as possible to get your jobs done, more weight means more compaction on the "turf" and its harder to get "unstuck" when the unfortunate happens. Just my 2 cents worth.
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Old 07-13-2010, 04:45 PM   #9
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Salt's already down the drain, literally. What I think I'm going to try is filling the tires up to the top of the transmision, that way the tractor won't be top heavy and will have some weight for pulling.



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